The following information was obtained from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Tanzania.

Recommended Vaccinations and Preventive Medications
The following vaccines may be recommended for your travel to East Africa. Discuss your travel plans and personal health with a health-care provider to determine which vaccines you will need.

  • Hepatitis A or immune globulin (IG). Transmission of hepatitis A virus can occur through direct person-to-person contact; through exposure to contaminated water, ice, or shellfish harvested in contaminated water; or from fruits, vegetables, or other foods that are eaten uncooked and that were contaminated during harvesting or subsequent handling.
  • Hepatitis B, especially if you might be exposed to blood or body fluids (for example, health-care workers), have sexual contact with the local population, or be exposed through medical treatment. Hepatitis B vaccine is now recommended for all infants and for children ages 11-12 years who did not receive the series as infants.
  • Malaria: your risk of malaria may be high in all countries in East Africa, including cities. See your health care provider for a prescription antimalarial drug.
  • Meningococcal (meningitis) if you plan to visit countries in this region that experience epidemics of meningococcal disease during December through June.
  • Rabies, pre-exposure vaccination, if you might have extensive unprotected outdoor exposure in rural areas, such as might occur during camping, hiking, or bicycling, or engaging in certain occupational activities.
  • Typhoid vaccine. Typhoid fever can be contracted through contaminated drinking water or food, or by eating food or drinking beverages that have been handled by a person who is infected. Large outbreaks are most often related to fecal contamination of water supplies or foods sold by street vendors
  • Yellow fever, a viral disease that occurs primarily in sub-Saharan Africa and tropical South America, is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes. The virus is also present in Panama and Trinidad and Tobago. Yellow fever vaccination is recommended for travelers to endemic areas and may be required to cross certain international borders (For country specific requirements, see Yellow Fever Vaccine Requirements and Information on Malaria Risk and Prophylaxis, by Country.). Vaccination should be given 10 days before travel and at 10 year intervals if there is on-going risk.
  • As needed, booster doses for tetanus-diphtheria, measles, and a one-time dose of polio vaccine for adults.

Malaria

Malaria is always a serious disease and may be a deadly illness. Humans get malaria from the bite of a mosquito infected with the parasite. Your risk of malaria may be high in all countries in East Africa, including cities. All travelers to East Africa, including infants, children, and former residents of East Africa, may be at risk for malaria. Prevent this serious disease by seeing your health care provider for a prescription antimalarial drug and by protecting yourself against mosquito bites.

All travelers should take one of the following drugs:

  • atovaquone/proguanil,
  • doxycycline,
  • mefloquine, or
  • primaquine (in special circumstances).

Yellow Fever

A certificate of yellow fever vaccination is required for entry into Tanzania when arriving from countries where yellow fever is present.

Food and Waterborne Diseases

Make sure your food and drinking water are safe. Food and waterborne diseases are the primary cause of illness in travelers. Travelers’ diarrhea can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or parasites, which are found throughout East Africa and can contaminate food or water. Infections may cause diarrhea and vomiting (E. coli, Salmonella, cholera, and parasites), fever (typhoid fever and toxoplasmosis), or liver damage (hepatitis).

Covid

Ultimate Kilimanjaro is fully compliant with the Standard Operating Procedures published by Tanzania’s Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism. The two main goals of the new procedures are to ensure that tourists entering the country do not bring in COVID-19 and to prevent tourists from infection while in the country.

Extra precautions are taken when interacting with clients and when packing, transporting, and preparing food and equipment for climbers. Personal protective equipment are worn by staff and the number of staff interactions with clients are also limited.

Our clients should expect the following on their climb:

  • Tourists will be subjected to a temperature check on arrival at the airport, park gate, and hotels. Individuals showing signs or symptoms of COVID-19 on arrival in Tanzania will be directed to a medical team for further consultation.
  • All mountain crew will wear masks when they are in vehicles, at the park gate and while they are at camp. Hotel staff will wear masks when interacting with clients.
  • All mountain crew and hotel staff will maintain a distance of at least three feet (one meter) from clients. However, in dealing with a medical emergency, it may be necessary to be in closer proximity.
  • It is mandatory for all clients to wear a mask when travelling in vehicles and when in public places. Clients are required to supply their own masks. Medical masks (KN95, N95, surgical masks) and non-medical face coverings (cloth mask, neck gaiter, Buff) are both sufficient.
  • Clients should carry hand sanitizer on their person at all times. Clients are required to supply their own hand sanitizer.

To read the general operating procedures that we will implement as well as procedures surrounding transfer vehicles, camping equipment, mountain dining, trip briefings and health checks, and hotel stays, click here.

Ebola

You have probably heard the news about the periodic Ebola outbreaks in Africa. In 2014-2015, there were 28,616 reported cases originating in West Africa (Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia).

There is currently zero risk of exposure to Ebola while in Tanzania. As the map illustrates, the outbreak was many thousands of miles away and many years ago. Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with an infected person’s body fluids. Infected people are not contagious during the incubation period, and only become contagious with the onset of symptoms. Therefore people who are most at risk are health care workers and families of infected people, not tourists.

Learn more about Ebola here.