Dec 272015
 
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  1. Mount Kilimanjaro is the tallest mountain in Africa, making it one of the seven summits. It is considered to be the easiest of the seven summits because it requires no technical skills or equipment, such as rope, harness, crampons or ice axe.
  2. Kilimanjaro is the world’s tallest free standing mountain, at 5,895 meters (19,341 feet). While most high mountains are part of ranges, such as Mount Everest’s Himalayan Mountain Range, free standing mountains are usually a result of volcanic activity.
  3. Kilimanjaro lies 205 miles from the Equator. When early explorers reported seeing glaciers on the top of Kilimanjaro, people did not believe them as they thought it was impossible for ice to form so close to the equatorial sun. Scientists now believe that the glaciers shrink and then regrow during the planet’s ice ages.
  4. Kilimanjaro once had three volcanic cones – Kibo, Shira and Mawenzi. Kibo is the tallest. Shira has since collapsed, creating the Shira Plateau. Mawenzi is 5,149 meters (16,896 feet) tall, and is the third highest peak in Africa, after Mount Kilimanjaro and Mount Kenya.
  5. Shira and Mawenzi are extinct volcanoes. However, Kibo is a dormant volcano; it can erupt again. The last major eruption was 360,000 years ago. The most recent activity was 200,000 years ago. Those who climb to the crater rim will be greeted by the smell of sulfur from the volcano’s lava.
  6. The origin of the name Kilimanjaro is not certain. The most popular answer is that the name comes from the Swahili word “Kilima” (mountain) and the Chagga word “Njaro” (whiteness).
  7. Mount Kilimanjaro was first climbed in 1889 by a German geologist Hans Meyer, an Austrian climber Ludwig Purtscheller and a local guide Yohani Kinyala Lauwo.  On Hans Meyer’s first attempt in 1887, he made it to the base of Kibo because he did not have equipment for heavy snow and ice. He made a second attempt in 1888 that was also unsuccessful.
  8. Now approximately 30,000 people climb Kilimanjaro every year. Unfortunately about 50% of climbers fail, mostly due to altitude sickness. The best way to climb is to use a longer route to aid in acclimatization.
  9. The fastest ascent and descent of Kilimanjaro was completed by Swiss Karl Egloff in just 6 hours and 42 minutes in 2014.
  10. The oldest person to climb Kilimanjaro is 86 year old Angela Vorobyova, a retired Russian school teacher, who climbed in 2015. The previous record holder was American Bob Wheeler, who climbed Kilimanjaro at the age of 85 years and 201 days in 2014.
  11. The youngest person to climb Kilimanjaro is American Keats Boyd. He climbed Kilimanjaro at 7 years old in 2008. The minimum age for climbing Kilimanjaro is 10 years old, but exceptions are made with children that have significant experience trekking.
  12. Kilimanjaro’s glaciers have shrunk 82% since 1912. Scientists estimate the glaciers may be completely gone in 50 years. The cause of this is thought to be due to deforestation, and not necessary global warming. Nearly 5 million indigenous trees were planted around the base of the mountain in 2008 to combat the issue.

Nov 302015
 

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In 2009, Ultimate Kilimanjaro® participated in the making of the award winning documentary starring Kristen Kenny. During her stay in Africa she contracted malaria but was saved by a $7 hospital stay. She realized the need for malaria medicine for locals, who often do not have access to it and cannot pay for it. Kristen started Malaika for Life, a nonprofit organization that has since treated over 40,000 people for malaria.
Buy a bracelet. Save a life!

http://malaikaforlife.org/
Story on ABC –> http://abc7.com/…/santa-monica-entrepreneur-fights-…/300509/
Documentary –> http://www.tanzaniathemovie.com/

Jul 282015
 

1378321742370346160President Barack Obama said Sunday that climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, a safari in the Masai Mara and a beach holiday in Lamu were all on his bucket list for after his presidency.

“I know that there are places in this beautiful nation that I haven’t discovered, so I am gonna make sure when I get back, and it is not just Kenya, it is an ecosystem connected from Uganda to Tanzania,” he told Kenya’s CapitalFM in an interview marking the end of his Kenya visit.

“Climbing Kilimanjaro seems like something that should be on my list of things to do once I get out of here. The Secret Service generally doesn’t like me climbing mountains, but as a private citizen hopefully I can get away with something like that.”

The 5,895-metre (19,341-foot) peak, just over the border in Tanzania, is Africa’s highest mountain.

He said he loved the Masai Mara and Serengeti national parks in Kenya and Tanzania, and had fond memories of a trip to Lamu island, on Kenya’s Indian Ocean coast, that he made with his wife Michelle when they were engaged.

“Lamu is high on my list. Michelle and I went there when we were engaged, I remember taking those dhows out, fishing, and the captain of the boat cooking the fish right on the beach. It was remarkable,” he told CapitalFM

Oct 202014
 

We receive many inquiries concerning Ebola, so we will repeat this: there is virtually zero chance of contracting Ebola while in Tanzania. There has never been a case of Ebola in Tanzania. The current outbreak in Western Africa is as far away from Tanzania as Europe, as the map shows, more than 3,300 miles.

In order to put our customers at ease, we will allow rescheduling your climb for up to a full year later, without any fees, if a confirmed case of Ebola occurs within Tanzania.

Book with confidence with Ultimate Kilimanjaro! 1924682_882262788452403_4905176723758053866_n

Aug 242014
 

ebola map smallYou have probably heard the news about the ongoing Ebola epidemic in Africa. As of August 21, 2014, there have been approximately 2,500 reported cases, with nearly 100% of these cases originating in West Africa (Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia). There have been 15 cases originating in Nigeria.

There is virtually zero risk of exposure to Ebola while in Tanzania. As the map illustrates, the outbreak is many thousands of miles away. Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with an infected person’s body fluids. Infected people are not contagious during the incubation period, and only become contagious with the onset of symptoms. Therefore people who are most at risk are health care workers and families of infected people, not tourists.

While we understand your concern and care for your safety, it is safe to continue with your Kilimanjaro plans until further notice. We will monitor the situation very closely and notify our clients of any changes. Should Ebola become an issue in Tanzania, trip insurance, which is a requirement for participation in our trips, would reimburse you for expenses if you purchase the optional coverage “Cancel for Any Reason.”

Learn more about Ebola here.

Apr 222014
 

ultimate-kilimanjaro-safaris

Leaving so soon?

Enjoy a safari while you’re here. You do not want to miss out on our world class safari destinations – Ngorongoro Crater & Serengeti National Park. Tanzania is a mecca for game viewing, with more protected areas than any other African country, with more than 25% of its land is comprised of national parks, game reserves and conservation areas.

Expore nature on our private safaris, ranging from one to seven day itineraries. Our expert guides will take you on an amazing journey into the heart of Tanzania’s wildlife.

http://www.ultimatekilimanjaro.com/safari.htm